Adopt Tengui the Malayan Tapir
Adopt Tengui the Malayan Tapir

Adopt Tengui the Malayan Tapir

Regular price £25.00
Unit price  per 

Malayan Tapir (Tapirus indicus)

Tapirs are unapologetic water-lovers, and Tengui is no exception! Her favourite past-time on a hot day is a nice cool dip in the pond.  Tengui is a real favourite with keepers and visitors alike.

Your Adoption Really Helps

By adopting an Aspinall animal, you are helping to support our amazing overseas work and back to the wild campaigns.

What's included in your adoption?

Digital pack £25
  • Digital adoption pack including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Adoption pack will be delivered straight to your inbox
  •  

    Printed pack £35 
  • 18cm cuddly toy
  • Adoption folder including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Please allow up to 14 days for delivery
  • Fun Facts about Malayan Tapirs

    Malayan tapirs have very poor eyesight and rely on their excellent sense of smell.

    Diet & habits

    Tapirs use their gripping trunk to grab branches for their leaves and tasty fruit, they will eat in the morning and in the evening. 

    Tapirs help with the reseeding of plants when they defecate and deposit seeds they have eaten. The world's biggest tapir, the black and white Malayan tapir can grow to 360kg.

    Where they can be found in the wild?

    You can find tapirs in the forests and grasslands of Central and Southern America, with the exception of the woolly tapir, which lives high in the Andes mountains.

    What do tapirs love to do each day?

    Tapirs like to roll around in the mud and are excellent swimmers and will dive under the water to find aquatic plants to feed on using their prehensile trunk as a snorkel. They are capable of reaching speeds of up to 20mph to escape predators, often crashing through the undergrowth before diving underwater.

    How we're helping  

    These animals are potential candidates for future rewilding.