Adopt Cillian & Settanta the Giraffes
Adopt Cillian & Settanta the Giraffes
Adopt Cillian & Settanta the Giraffes

Adopt Cillian & Settanta the Giraffes

Regular price £25.00
Unit price  per 

Giraffes (Giraffa camelopardalis)

Giraffes roam in small groups of about six.  Males or bulls can sometimes have butting contests with their long necks and heads to establish dominance until one submits and walks away. Female giraffes give birth while standing and the infants have a long fall to the ground (around 5 feet), but are so resilient that they can stand within half an hour of birth and after just 10 hours be running alongside mum.

Your Adoption Really Helps

By adopting an Aspinall animal, you are helping to support our amazing overseas work and back to the wild campaigns.

What's included in your adoption?

Digital pack £25 
  • Digital adoption pack including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Adoption pack will be delivered straight to your inbox 

  • Printed pack £35 
  • 18cm cuddly toy
  • Adoption folder including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Please allow up to 14 days for delivery
  • Fun Facts about giraffes

    The heart of a giraffe weighs around 25 pounds - big enough to pump blood all the way up to its brain. 

    With legs around 6 feet tall the giraffe is one of the worlds tallest mammals and with those long legs can run as fast as 35 miles an hour across short distances and 10 miles an hour over longer distances.

     

    Diet & habits

    Using their height, a giraffe will eat leaves and buds on the treetops others can't reach.  Its long tongue can grab the tasty morsels off branches and it regurgitates its food to chew it as cud like a cow would eating hundreds of pounds of leaves each week.

     

    Where they can be found in the wild

    Found across the African Savana and in the Serengeti National park.

     

    How we're helping 

    Port Lympne Reserve in Kent is home to a breeding group as well as 3 castrated hybrid boys.