Adopt Nusu the Elephant
Adopt Nusu the Elephant
Adopt Nusu the Elephant

Adopt Nusu the Elephant

Regular price £25.00
Unit price  per 

Nusu the Elephant (Loxodonta africana)

The herd of 14 African elephants are having a great year - the arrival of calves Oku and Nguvu has given little Nusu some very welcome playmates, although he does still spend a lot of his time playing with favourite Aunt Manzi or hanging around with the young bulls Impi and Mchumba, learning important bull social behaviour.

Your Adoption Really Helps

By adopting an Aspinall animal, you are helping to support our amazing overseas work and back to the wild campaigns.

What's included in your adoption?

Digital pack £25 
  • Digital adoption pack including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Adoption pack will be sent straight to your inbox 

  • Printed pack £35 
  • 18cm cuddly toy
  • Adoption folder including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Please allow up to 14 days for delivery 
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    Key Facts about the African Elephant

    Elephant diet & habits

    African elephants eat seed bearing plants and fruits, picking up berries from the ground and plucking leaves from trees.  They also like green grass. 

    Where they can be found in the wild?

    Found in sub-Saharan Africa there are 37 countries where African elephants live, with an estimated 70% in Southern African and the other 30% split between Eastern, Central and West Africa.

    Did you know? 

    The African elephant’s trunk is actually an elongated nose and upper lip and an adults trunk can measure 7 feet long!  They use their trunks, for smelling, breathing, drinking, vocalising and handling things.

    Fun Fact

    Elephants help to spread plants by eating seeds which re-emerge undigested.

    How we're helping 

    The largest terrestrial animal requires massive amounts of browse every day, which is sourced from our own woodlands. The Aspinall Foundation is investigating the possible reintroduction of our herd to a private reserve in Africa.