Adopt the Rhino Herd at Howletts
Adopt the Rhino Herd at Howletts

Adopt the Rhino Herd at Howletts

Regular price £25.00
Unit price  per 

Rhino Herd at Howletts (Diceros bicornis michaeli)

Bull rhino, Sammy is a big strong individual with a particularly muscular neck, but does get put in his place by the ladies!  Salome is easily recognisable by her extremely long front horn.  She is mum to Mizi, born in 2016.   The fourth member of our herd is Damara who was born at Port Lympne but joined our herd at Howletts where she has successfully bred.

Your Adoption Really Helps

By adopting an Aspinall animal, you are helping to support our amazing overseas work and back to the wild campaigns.

What's included in your adoption?

Digital pack £25 
  • Digital adoption pack including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Adoption pack will be delivered straight to your inbox 

  • Printed pack £35 
  • 18cm cuddly toy
  • Adoption folder including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Please allow up to 14 days for delivery
  • Fun Facts about rhinos 

    Black rhinos have been known to charge at trains passing through their territory.

    Diet & habits

    Black rhinos are browsers that like to eat bushes and trees, they pluck leaves and fruit from branches using their pointed upper lip.

    Black rhinos are solitary creatures, unless it is a female and her calf.  A female only reproduces every two and a half to five years and the calf will stay with its mother until it is about 3years old. When not rolling in the mud to coat their skin with bug repellent they will take cover in the shade from the hot African sun and feed at night. 

    Where can they be found in the wild?

    On the verge of extinction due to poaching, the black rhino once roamed most of the sub-Saharan Africa.

    Threats to black rhinos

    Rhino horn is revered for medicinal uses in China, Taiwan, Hong Kong and Singapore. It is also used to make ornamental dagger handles in North Africa and the Middle East. Many rhinos have been killed for their horns and are on the verge of extinction due to this.

    How we're helping 

    The Aspinall Foundation are the top breeders of eastern black rhino in the UK and have sent 8 black rhinos back to protected areas of their ancestral homeland. 3 went to South Africa and 5 went to Tanzania. Our rhinos have gone on to breed very successfully and their descendants are now repopulating new areas.