Adopt Tembe the Honey Badger
Adopt Tembe the Honey Badger

Adopt Tembe the Honey Badger

Regular price £25.00
Unit price  per 

Tembe the Honey Badger (Mellivora capensis)

Tembe, like many honey badgers, is cheeky and mischievous. She has recently turned 3 years old. In the wild at this age she would have left her birthing den to venture out on her own.

We are currently investigating the possibility of releasing Tembe in South Africa. As there are only 11 honey badgers in captivity in Europe the gene pool for breeding is unsustainable. At present, Tembe hides down her tunnel and avoids her keepers when they go into her enclosure, this is a good sign that she could be successful in a reintroduction programme. We are hopeful that Tembe will eventually breed with wild honey badgers bringing increasing the genetics in the wild population.

Your Adoption Really Helps

By adopting an Aspinall animal, you are helping to support our amazing overseas work and back to the wild campaigns.

What's included in your adoption?

Digital pack £25 
  • Digital adoption pack including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Adoption pack will be delivered straight to your inbox 

  • Printed postal pack £35 
  • Adoption folder including photocard and fact sheet about your chosen animal written by the expert team at The Aspinall Foundation.
  • Certificate of adoption 
  • Please allow up to 14 days for delivery
  • Please note: Automatic name generation is currently unavailable for Digital adoptions certificates. These will be left blank for the purchaser or recipient to enter. For Printed Adoptions please provide the recipients name and it will be manually entered when you order is processed.  

    Fun Facts about Honey Badgers

    They are listed in the Guinness Book of Records as the world's most fearless animal and will attack elephants and lions if annoyed.

    Diet & habits
    They love to feed on honey and honeybee larvae but will also eat roots and berries, fruits and bulbs. These voracious omnivores also like the odd insect, frog, reptiles, birds and small mammals.

    Often seen alone, honey badgers mate all year and will often have just one cub at a time. They prefer the cover of darkness when near humans, but can be active during the day and its not uncommon to spot mating pairs. They hunt for their own food but are also happy stealing from others or scavenging from bigger kills when the opportunity arises. With prominent, sharp teeth and long foreclaws they can easily rip meat from bone. 

    Where can they be found in the wild?

    Found throughout sub-Saharan Africa, they can adapt to rainforests, cool mountains and can also be found in Saudi Arabia, Iran and Western Asia. They are related to skunks, otters, ferrets and other badgers. These medium-sized honey badgers (also known as ratels) have a super-sized attitude!

    Will Tembe ever go back to the wild?

    At present she avoids her keepers and hides down her tunnel, so this is a good sign that she could be successful in a reintroduction programme. We are hopeful that Tembe will eventually breed with wild honey badgers bringing in new genetics to the wild population.

     

    How we're helping 

    Howletts recorded the world's first captive birth of this species and are currently investigating the possibility of releasing Tembe in South Africa. There are only 11 honey badgers in captivity in Europe; the gene pool for breeding is unsustainable.